You’re going to find the following either cool or boring:So this is a picture of my calendar currently. September’s picture is M60 (the round fuzzy elliptical galaxy) and NGC4647 (the smaller blue spiral galaxy). Each morning while I’m considering getting out of bed I look across and see it.Perhaps that’s why, when I came to choose a picture to put on my poster that showed the two main types of galaxy, I picked this one.
This paper was published in Nature today. A couple of people I know are authors. It’s kind of a big deal for two reasons 1) Nature is probably the most prestigious journal in science. 2) The actual result published in it is big news.
Basically they found a supermassive black hole in an ultra compact dwarf galaxy (more on that later probably). We’ve known the article and associated press releases were coming out this week.
Anyway, turns out the UCD in question lives on the outskirts of none other than M60, the galaxy I’ve been staring at every morning since the start of the month:

Funny old world.

You’re going to find the following either cool or boring:

So this is a picture of my calendar currently. September’s picture is M60 (the round fuzzy elliptical galaxy) and NGC4647 (the smaller blue spiral galaxy). Each morning while I’m considering getting out of bed I look across and see it.
Perhaps that’s why, when I came to choose a picture to put on my poster that showed the two main types of galaxy, I picked this one.

This paper was published in Nature today. A couple of people I know are authors. It’s kind of a big deal for two reasons 1) Nature is probably the most prestigious journal in science. 2) The actual result published in it is big news.

Basically they found a supermassive black hole in an ultra compact dwarf galaxy (more on that later probably). We’ve known the article and associated press releases were coming out this week.

Anyway, turns out the UCD in question lives on the outskirts of none other than M60, the galaxy I’ve been staring at every morning since the start of the month:

Funny old world.

acalc
acalc:

Hmm, not familiar with dragon fruit, worldken. I don’t think it grows in this region. But I think I determined what this is. I believe it’s from a southern magnolia tree (Magnolia grandiflora). It does resemble the fruit from magnolia trees I’ve seen before, except the magnolias I’ve seen only had green-colored fruit and were not as big. Two weird things, though:
the fruit was found by itself, near a stream, with no obvious parent tree it came from
looked at a map of those trees’ range, and they’re clearly not in the area I live in (which speaks more to concentration or prevalence than absolute possibility I should note)

So I haven’t seen a dragon fruit in a while (not in supermarkets this time of year), and upon Googling for a picture of one it’s clearly not what you found.

What is odd is it never ocurred to me that you wouldn’t have heard of dragon fruit. Maybe I secretly assume my town’s pretty humdrum so if we have dragon fruit in supermarkets *everyone* has dragon fruit in supermarkets…
I’ve never gotten round to eating one for some reason.
That’s really odd that the fruit you found wasn’t in its expected environment…

acalc:

Hmm, not familiar with dragon fruit, worldken. I don’t think it grows in this region. But I think I determined what this is. I believe it’s from a southern magnolia tree (Magnolia grandiflora). It does resemble the fruit from magnolia trees I’ve seen before, except the magnolias I’ve seen only had green-colored fruit and were not as big. Two weird things, though:

  1. the fruit was found by itself, near a stream, with no obvious parent tree it came from
  2. looked at a map of those trees’ range, and they’re clearly not in the area I live in (which speaks more to concentration or prevalence than absolute possibility I should note)

So I haven’t seen a dragon fruit in a while (not in supermarkets this time of year), and upon Googling for a picture of one it’s clearly not what you found.

What is odd is it never ocurred to me that you wouldn’t have heard of dragon fruit. Maybe I secretly assume my town’s pretty humdrum so if we have dragon fruit in supermarkets *everyone* has dragon fruit in supermarkets…

I’ve never gotten round to eating one for some reason.

That’s really odd that the fruit you found wasn’t in its expected environment…

quantumaniac

archiemcphee:

We see clouds so often that it’s easy to forget how amazing they are. Thankfully German astronaut and geophysicist Alexander Gerst is currently aboard the International Space Station where he often spends his free time taking countless extraordinary photos of the Earth as it’s whizzing by 205 miles below.

Gerst is particularly fond of photographing dramatic shadows cast by cloud formations - something that we cannot see down here on Earth. These stunning photos remind how awesome clouds are as they cast shadows that stretch for thousands of miles across the planet’s surface. Shadows so long that they eventually disappear into the black horizon.

Follow Alexander Gerst’s Twitter feed for new photos shared daily.

[via Colossal]

Did not win at the conference. Pity - I could have reclaimed the costs of printing my poster and paid my rent.

Did drink two glasses of wine and am having trouble concentrating on marking students’ astrophysics assignments. You know you’re no longer an undergrad when…

quantumaniac

rollership:

An end to plastic packaging poisoning us and all the life that feeds off the ocean is very very possible.

worclipThis Too Shall Pass (2012) by Tomorrow Machine

Independent packaging project for perishable goods:

Is it reasonable that it takes several years for a milk carton to decompose naturally, when the milk goes sour after a week? This Too Shall Pass is a series of food packaging were the packaging has the same short life-span as the foods they contain. The package and its content is working in symbiosis.

Smoothie package
Gel of the agar agar seaweed and water are the only components used to make this package. To open it you pick the top. The package will wither at the same speed as its content. It is made for drinks that have a short life span and needs to be refrigerated, fresh juice, smoothies and cream for example.

Rice Package
Package made of biodegradable beeswax. To open it you peel it like a fruit. The package is designed to contain dry goods, for example grains and rice.

Oil package
A package made of caramelized sugar, coated with wax. To open it you crack it like an egg. When the material is cracked the wax do no longer protect the sugar and the package melts when it comes in contact with water. This package is made for oil-based food.

anengineersaspect

ted:

Can you imagine living in a bubble for two years? Well, these people did it. Back in the 90s, Jane Poynter wanted to understand the delicate balance of the Earth’s ecosystem. So she and seven others moved into a sealed biosphere for 2 years and 20 minutes. (That last twenty minutes matters when you’re stuck in a giant bubble.) The challenges they faced — from spending 4 months making a single pizza to being short on oxygen — make for a pretty incredible story.

Hear her tell the story »

lorygilmore

vvhitehouse:

aneastcoastbreeze:

vvhitehouse:

advantages to wearing oversized sweaters:

  • instant cute outfit with minimal effort
  • it enhances the coziness when u drink hot beverages
  • sweater paws are guaranteed to make u feel 43% more adorable
  • u can unbutton ur jeans and no one will know

disadvantages to wearing oversized sweaters:

Guys think they’re totally not cute lol

the day i dress for a man is the day they dress me in my coffin to see jesus