The Pitch Has Dropped! (Technically)
Noone has ever witnessed a drop fall in the world’s longest running lab experiment (it’s been running since 1927), until now.It’s 13 years since the last drop fell, and that drop (the eighth) can be seen holding up the current drop in the beaker above.
Now we wait and see if the drop disconnects properly or if we move straight on to the tenth.

The Pitch Has Dropped! (Technically)

Noone has ever witnessed a drop fall in the world’s longest running lab experiment (it’s been running since 1927), until now.
It’s 13 years since the last drop fell, and that drop (the eighth) can be seen holding up the current drop in the beaker above.

Now we wait and see if the drop disconnects properly or if we move straight on to the tenth.

skepticalavenger
skepticalavenger:


I wish I’d had this a few weeks ago, when I was telling students how not to present their data. This is a chart illustrating the effects of stand-your-ground-laws on murder in Florida.
I glanced at that and thought, “Whoa, surprise: the stand-your-ground-laws had a pretty dramatic effect in reducing murder. I did not expect that at all.”
And then I was a bit disappointed: “But they really should have set the Y axis at zero. It’s a bit misleading and magnifies the apparent effect, otherwise.”
And then I did a double-take: “They inverted the freaking Y axis!”
That’s right. It doesn’t show a decline, it shows a dramatic spike in murder after the law was passed. The text in the article actually says that clearly, but the chart was actively selling the opposite message. They’ve since added a corrected chart that actually makes the point clearly, instead of obscuring it.

I took away two points. It’s really easy to lie with graphics, and shouldn’t any evidence-based legal system recognize the consequences of passing a bad law and correct itself?

Unfreakinbelievable.

skepticalavenger:

I wish I’d had this a few weeks ago, when I was telling students how not to present their data. This is a chart illustrating the effects of stand-your-ground-laws on murder in Florida.

I glanced at that and thought, “Whoa, surprise: the stand-your-ground-laws had a pretty dramatic effect in reducing murder. I did not expect that at all.”

And then I was a bit disappointed: “But they really should have set the Y axis at zero. It’s a bit misleading and magnifies the apparent effect, otherwise.”

And then I did a double-take: “They inverted the freaking Y axis!”

That’s right. It doesn’t show a decline, it shows a dramatic spike in murder after the law was passed. The text in the article actually says that clearly, but the chart was actively selling the opposite message. They’ve since added a corrected chart that actually makes the point clearly, instead of obscuring it.

betterfloridagundeaths

I took away two points. It’s really easy to lie with graphics, and shouldn’t any evidence-based legal system recognize the consequences of passing a bad law and correct itself?

Unfreakinbelievable.

Ah, I hope I didn’t remove her too far from her territory. It didn’t seem right to let her back into the kitchen, but it’s a long way back for a tiny spider (even one that can jump three times its body length).

Edit: Pretty sure this one was a he (assuming they’re all Adanson’s House Jumpers).

Spider vignette

I went out to the kitchen to do the dishes and was greeted by a drowned jumping spider in the sink. This is very sad as the jumping spiders in my flat are friends who keep the less desirable members of the animal kingdom out.

However, rather giving it (her?) a prompt but solemn burial at sea, as it were, I set aside the cup for a moment. Then, out the corner of my eye, I sensed movement. At first I thought it was just caused by the ripples I’d raised in moving the cup, but a minute or two later the position of the body changed again.

So, I started to decant, and slowly but surely, legs reached out, dry land was found, and life was restored.

I can’t tell you how pleased I was when she finally emerged over the edge of the cup and hurried off into the shadows.

The moral of the story kids: always decant your spiders. You might save a life.

the-naut

bottledspider:

petermorwood:

rudesby:

I marathoned the show ‘Vikings’ last week and this was ALL I COULD THINK ABOUT.

Blood-feuds made for great saga entertainment (also novels, TV and movies) but peaceful discussion was another thing entirely. (ouch).

The first ep of Vikings cracks me up because everyone keeps saying “you going to the thing?” “hey, I’ll see you at the thing” and I wonder if anyone not up on their early medieval Scandinavian governmental systems thought that they were just being really vague

Ah, the thing thing made me so happy. Nearly as happy as when the first words out of Athelstan’s mouth were Old English :D

coolsciencegifs

thecraftychemist:

'If I shake it it turns red, but if I shake it really well it turns green'

'If I shake [the flask on the right in the first gif] it turns blue - this flask not only contains a solution, but it also contains air. I'm mixing oxygen with the liquid and it changes color. After a while the solution will change back to colorless. Did the reaction move backwards? No, there's a second chemical reaction. The solution contains methylene blue so when it reacts with oxygen it turns blue, but there's a second chemical - glucose which slowly turns the methylene blue back. [The one on the left] uses a different chemical called ‘Indigo carmine’. This is a yellow liquid, if i shake i it turns red, if i give it a really good shake it turns green. But leave it long enough and the green turns red again.’

It’s a pretty good presentation from the Royal Institution.

Video sources: 1 2.

lapantruca

popthirdworld:

cherryblossomzoe:

mahasm:

scorpius-rising:

So CNN just showed a report on the royal visit to New Zealand, which not only actively mocked the cultural traditions of the Maori, comparing the haka to the mating dance of the emu, but also denigrated the cultural traditions of many other groups as being ‘native’ and generally silly. It’s this kind of shoddy journalism and blatant racism that perpetuates an idea of multiculturalism being some kind of childish joke and trivialises the identity of 15% of NZ’s population. If you want to do something about it, there is a complaint here, and the petition associated with it here.  .

This is disgusting CNN. Please sign the petition guys.

This is absolutely disgusting!  THIS IS NOT JOURNALISM, I REPEAT THIS IS NOT JOURNALISM.

to be fair, CNN journalists have to make up filler stories out of non-stories all the time because of the 24/7 news cycle (that they have no one but themselves to blame for committing to) so if in this instance several cultures get ridiculed, we should be kind and sympathise with the poor journalist who used mocking others’ traditions as a device to literally waste time. I’m kidding, sign the petition.

Just when I thought I couldn’t be surprised by anything the media (CNN inc) can come up with, this one goes and hits it out of the park.

bookporn
jothelibrarian:

uispeccoll:

thegirlwhoisthursday:

libralthinking:

uispeccoll:

Thanks to librarian Lindsay Morecraft for supplying perfectly appropriate thumbs for this shot.
Facsimile edition of the 15th century (ca. 1460-1477), heart-shaped Chansonnier de Jean de Montchenu (Ms. Occ. Rothschild 2973) housed in the Bibliothèque nationale de France. Polyphonic chansons for 2-4 voices. Choir book is in the shape of a heart. Issued in leather case (23 cm.). Contains Middle French and Italian secular pieces by or attributed to Barbingant, Fedé, Bedingham, Dufay, Dunstable, Binchois, Frye, Busnois, Caron, Cornago, Ghizeghem, Morton, Ockeghem, Vincenet and others. One of 1380 numbered copies signed by a notary.
Rita Benton Music Rare Book Room FOLIO M2 .C428 2010 University of Iowa.

Extra thanks to Lindsay for finishing her MLS and getting hired full time so I can call her “librarian” there for the first time :)

This gives me feelings one probably shouldn’t have about books.

That is a daily job hazard in Special Collections.

Stunning!
Also, congratulations and well done on the MLIS! :)

jothelibrarian:

uispeccoll:

thegirlwhoisthursday:

libralthinking:

uispeccoll:

Thanks to librarian Lindsay Morecraft for supplying perfectly appropriate thumbs for this shot.

Facsimile edition of the 15th century (ca. 1460-1477), heart-shaped Chansonnier de Jean de Montchenu (Ms. Occ. Rothschild 2973) housed in the Bibliothèque nationale de France.
Polyphonic chansons for 2-4 voices.
Choir book is in the shape of a heart. Issued in leather case (23 cm.).
Contains Middle French and Italian secular pieces by or attributed to Barbingant, Fedé, Bedingham, Dufay, Dunstable, Binchois, Frye, Busnois, Caron, Cornago, Ghizeghem, Morton, Ockeghem, Vincenet and others.
One of 1380 numbered copies signed by a notary.

Rita Benton Music Rare Book Room FOLIO M2 .C428 2010
University of Iowa.

Extra thanks to Lindsay for finishing her MLS and getting hired full time so I can call her “librarian” there for the first time :)

This gives me feelings one probably shouldn’t have about books.

That is a daily job hazard in Special Collections.

Stunning!

Also, congratulations and well done on the MLIS! :)