archiemcphee

archiemcphee:

California-based Yarnboming artists Jill and Lorna Watt of Knits For Life (previously featured here) recently transformed a pair of unassuming benches near the San Francisco Ferry Building into adorably ferocious monsters, complete with six awesome orange feet. The irrepressibly inventive sisters created this delightful yarn installation for an upcoming episode of CCTV America’s new show Full Frame.

[via Laughing Squid]

The Pitch Has Dropped! (Technically)
Noone has ever witnessed a drop fall in the world’s longest running lab experiment (it’s been running since 1927), until now.It’s 13 years since the last drop fell, and that drop (the eighth) can be seen holding up the current drop in the beaker above.
Now we wait and see if the drop disconnects properly or if we move straight on to the tenth.

The Pitch Has Dropped! (Technically)

Noone has ever witnessed a drop fall in the world’s longest running lab experiment (it’s been running since 1927), until now.
It’s 13 years since the last drop fell, and that drop (the eighth) can be seen holding up the current drop in the beaker above.

Now we wait and see if the drop disconnects properly or if we move straight on to the tenth.

skepticalavenger
skepticalavenger:


I wish I’d had this a few weeks ago, when I was telling students how not to present their data. This is a chart illustrating the effects of stand-your-ground-laws on murder in Florida.
I glanced at that and thought, “Whoa, surprise: the stand-your-ground-laws had a pretty dramatic effect in reducing murder. I did not expect that at all.”
And then I was a bit disappointed: “But they really should have set the Y axis at zero. It’s a bit misleading and magnifies the apparent effect, otherwise.”
And then I did a double-take: “They inverted the freaking Y axis!”
That’s right. It doesn’t show a decline, it shows a dramatic spike in murder after the law was passed. The text in the article actually says that clearly, but the chart was actively selling the opposite message. They’ve since added a corrected chart that actually makes the point clearly, instead of obscuring it.

I took away two points. It’s really easy to lie with graphics, and shouldn’t any evidence-based legal system recognize the consequences of passing a bad law and correct itself?

Unfreakinbelievable.

skepticalavenger:

I wish I’d had this a few weeks ago, when I was telling students how not to present their data. This is a chart illustrating the effects of stand-your-ground-laws on murder in Florida.

I glanced at that and thought, “Whoa, surprise: the stand-your-ground-laws had a pretty dramatic effect in reducing murder. I did not expect that at all.”

And then I was a bit disappointed: “But they really should have set the Y axis at zero. It’s a bit misleading and magnifies the apparent effect, otherwise.”

And then I did a double-take: “They inverted the freaking Y axis!”

That’s right. It doesn’t show a decline, it shows a dramatic spike in murder after the law was passed. The text in the article actually says that clearly, but the chart was actively selling the opposite message. They’ve since added a corrected chart that actually makes the point clearly, instead of obscuring it.

betterfloridagundeaths

I took away two points. It’s really easy to lie with graphics, and shouldn’t any evidence-based legal system recognize the consequences of passing a bad law and correct itself?

Unfreakinbelievable.

Ah, I hope I didn’t remove her too far from her territory. It didn’t seem right to let her back into the kitchen, but it’s a long way back for a tiny spider (even one that can jump three times its body length).

Edit: Pretty sure this one was a he (assuming they’re all Adanson’s House Jumpers).

Spider vignette

I went out to the kitchen to do the dishes and was greeted by a drowned jumping spider in the sink. This is very sad as the jumping spiders in my flat are friends who keep the less desirable members of the animal kingdom out.

However, rather giving it (her?) a prompt but solemn burial at sea, as it were, I set aside the cup for a moment. Then, out the corner of my eye, I sensed movement. At first I thought it was just caused by the ripples I’d raised in moving the cup, but a minute or two later the position of the body changed again.

So, I started to decant, and slowly but surely, legs reached out, dry land was found, and life was restored.

I can’t tell you how pleased I was when she finally emerged over the edge of the cup and hurried off into the shadows.

The moral of the story kids: always decant your spiders. You might save a life.